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Staff / February 1st, 2018 / No Comments

I have added the photoshoot of Dakota Fanning for Vogue Australia. Enjoy!




Staff / February 1st, 2018 / No Comments

More new photos of Dakota Fanning have been added to the gallery.




Staff / February 1st, 2018 / No Comments

I have added the scans of Dakota Fanning for Vogue Australia (February 2018) to the gallery. Don’t forget to buy the magazine.




Staff / January 30th, 2018 / No Comments

A few photos of Dakota Fanning have been added to the gallery.




Staff / January 30th, 2018 / No Comments

Dakota Fanning covers the next issue of Vogue Australia (February 2018). At the moment, I just have the cover and 2 photos from the photoshoot but will add the scans as soon as possible and more photos. Don’t forget to buy the magazine.




Staff / January 30th, 2018 / No Comments

I have added some new movie stills of Dakota Fanning from ‘Please Stand By’. You can go to the gallery to take a look to the photos.




Staff / January 30th, 2018 / No Comments

TNT’s The Alienist launch last Monday night has averaged 3.1 million total viewers in Live+3 viewing, including nearly 1 million viewers 18-49.

Last Monday’s launch so far has reached a cumulative 13.1M viewers in telecasts last week; TNT claims nearly half of those viewers are new to the network. TNT’s Live+35 multiplatform projection is 16 million viewers. That would make it the network’s most successful launch since 2012, of eight new dramas that have already premiered this season.

The limited series, starring Dakota Fanning, Daniel Brühl and Luke Evans, is based on Caleb Carr’s 1994 psychological thriller set in 1896 New York City, opening with a series of gruesome murders of boy prostitutes.

The first episode also counts among its accomplishments a record digital opening for TNT. It generated more than 4 million total minutes watched on TNT’s apps and sites, sparking more than 10 million social engagements. [Source]




Staff / January 30th, 2018 / No Comments

Dakota Fanning has always been wise beyond her years. The blond-haired, doe-eyed actress got her first major role at the ripe age of 7 in 2004’s I Am Sam. Her performance as the precocious child of a developmentally challenged father (Sean Penn) earned her a SAG Award nomination the following year, making her the youngest nominee in history.

Now 23, Fanning shows no signs of slowing down. She currently stars as a police secretary on TNT’s period drama The Alienist and has a new film, Please Stand By, about an autistic woman who escapes from her group home to submit her Star Trek script to a Hollywood writing competition, arriving in theaters and on demand today. The latter was something of a-full circle moment for Fanning, as the subject matter paralleled the project that cemented her status as a leading actress. Here, Fanning discusses her new movie, learning to speak Klingon, and the need for female-focused stories.

What drew you to this script? It was so well-written and so moving. [Wendy] had so many quirks: her love of Star Trek, knitting, her dog … there were so many little things that were woven into her. Most importantly, the character didn’t lead with the fact that she was on the autism spectrum. There were so many other things that were more important about her.

In I Am Sam, you played the daughter of a man with a mental handicap. How did it feel to reverse roles? There were definitely some similarities. When we made I Am Sam, there were actors in the film who were developmentally disabled, and in this movie, there were actors on the autism spectrum. I was so thrilled that they were getting the opportunity to be a part of it. I got to know a bunch of them before we started filming, and the first thing I learned [from them] is that everyone on the spectrum is different, so I felt a lot of freedom to make Wendy an individual character—I didn’t base her on anyone in particular.

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